Анафора в английском, немецком и французском языках.

Самоучитель

Анафора/Единоначатие (anaphora ) — повторение звуков, слов или групп слов в начале каждого речевого отрывка. In linguistics, anaphora (/əˈnæfərə/) is the use of an expression whose interpretation depends upon another expression in context (its antecedent or postcedent). Die Anapher (von altgriechisch ἀναφορά anaphorá „das Zurückführen, die Rückbeziehung“ zu ἀναφέρω anaphero oder ἀναφορέω anaphoreo „zurückführen, beziehen auf“; vergleiche die Beziehung von Referenz zu lateinisch refero) ist ein rhetorisches Stilmittel; sie bezeichnet die (einmalige oder mehrfache) Wiederholung eines Wortes (oder einer Wortgruppe) am Anfang aufeinander folgender Verse, Strophen, Sätze oder Satzteile. L'anaphore (du grec ancien ἀναφορά / anaphorá, « reprise, rapport ») est une figure de style qui consiste à commencer des vers, des phrases ou des ensembles de phrases ou de vers par le même mot ou le même syntagme.  What the hammer? What the chain? Чей был молот, цепи чьи, In what furnace was thy brain? Чтоб скрепить мечты твои? What the anvil? What dread grasp Кто взметнул твой быстрый взмах, Dare its deadly terrors clasp? Ухватил смертельный страх? ("The Tiger" by William Blake ; Перевод Бальмонта) In a narrower sense, anaphora is the use of an expression that depends specifically upon an antecedent expression and thus is contrasted with cataphora, which is the use of an expression that depends upon a postcedent expression. The anaphoric (referring) term is called an anaphor. For example, in the sentence Sally arrived, but nobody saw her, the pronoun her is an anaphor, referring back to the antecedent Sally. In the sentence Before her arrival, nobody saw Sally, the pronoun her refers forward to the postcedent Sally, so her is now a cataphor (and an anaphor in the broader, but not the narrower, sense). Usually, an anaphoric expression is a pro-form or some other kind of deictic (contextually dependent) expression. Both anaphora and cataphora are species of endophora, referring to something mentioned elsewhere in a dialog or text. Anaphora is an important concept for different reasons and on different levels: first, anaphora indicates how discourse is constructed and maintained; second, anaphora binds different syntactical elements together at the level of the sentence; third, anaphora presents a challenge to natural language processing in computational linguistics, since the identification of the reference can be difficult; and fourth, anaphora partially reveals how language is understood and processed, which is relevant to fields of linguistics interested in cognitive psychology. So dient sie der Strukturierung und Rhythmisierung von Texten. Die wiederholten Einheiten werden ggf. als besonders bedeutsam hervorgehoben. Die Anapher zählt zu den einfachsten, ältesten und häufigsten rhetorischen und poetischen Stilmitteln. Sie begegnet besonders häufig in religiöser Sprache, etwa in der Bibel. Spiegelbildliches Gegenstück zur Anapher ist die Epipher; nahe verwandt mit beiden sind Anadiplose und Kyklos. L'anaphore rythme la phrase, souligne un mot, une obsession, provoque un effet musical, communique plus d'énergie au discours ou renforce une affirmation, un plaidoyer, suggère une incantation, une urgence. Syntaxiquement, elle permet de créer un effet de symétrie. The term anaphora is actually used in two ways. In a broad sense, it denotes the act of referring. Any time a given expression (e.g. a pro-form) refers to another contextual entity, anaphora is present. In a second, narrower sense, the term anaphora denotes the act of referring backwards in a dialog or text, such as referring to the left when an anaphor points to its left toward its antecedent in languages that are written from left to right. Etymologically, anaphora derives from Ancient Greek ἀναφορά (anaphorá, "a carrying back"), from ἀνά (aná, "up") + φέρω (phérō, "I carry"). In this narrow sense, anaphora stands in contrast to cataphora, which sees the act of referring forward in a dialog or text, or pointing to the right in languages that are written from left to right: Ancient Greek καταφορά (kataphorá, "a downward motion"), from κατά (katá, "downwards") + φέρω (phérō, "I carry"). A pro-form is a cataphor when it points to its right toward its postcedent. Both effects together are called either anaphora (broad sense) or less ambiguously, along with self-reference they comprise the category of endophora. Examples of anaphora (in the narrow sense) and cataphora are given next.  Giotto: „So klein, so fein, so Giotto.“ — Giotto → Die Betonung von „so“ stellt eine Verbindung zwischen den Adjektiven und der Süßigkeit her. Außerdem werden sie gesteigert.

Просмотр содержимого документа
«Анафора в английском, немецком и французском языках.»

Анафора в английском, немецком и французском языках.

Автор: Ершов Денис Иванович

Цикл: роль анафоры в языке

Анафора/Единоначатие (anaphora ) — повторение звуков, слов или групп слов в начале каждого речевого отрывка. In linguistics, anaphora (/əˈnæfərə/) is the use of an expression whose interpretation depends upon another expression in context (its antecedent or postcedent). Die Anapher (von altgriechisch ἀναφορά anaphorá „das Zurückführen, die Rückbeziehung“ zu ἀναφέρω anaphero oder ἀναφορέω anaphoreo „zurückführen, beziehen auf“; vergleiche die Beziehung von Referenz zu lateinisch refero) ist ein rhetorisches Stilmittel; sie bezeichnet die (einmalige oder mehrfache) Wiederholung eines Wortes (oder einer Wortgruppe) am Anfang aufeinander folgender Verse, Strophen, Sätze oder Satzteile. L’anaphore (du grec ancien ἀναφορά / anaphorá, « reprise, rapport ») est une figure de style qui consiste à commencer des vers, des phrases ou des ensembles de phrases ou de vers par le même mot ou le même syntagme. 
What the hammer? What the chain? Чей был молот, цепи чьи,
In what furnace was thy brain? Чтоб скрепить мечты твои?
What the anvil? What dread grasp Кто взметнул твой быстрый взмах,
Dare its deadly terrors clasp? Ухватил смертельный страх?
("The Tiger" by William Blake ; Перевод Бальмонта) In a narrower sense, anaphora is the use of an expression that depends specifically upon an antecedent expression and thus is contrasted with cataphora, which is the use of an expression that depends upon a postcedent expression. The anaphoric (referring) term is called an anaphor. For example, in the sentence Sally arrived, but nobody saw her, the pronoun her is an anaphor, referring back to the antecedent Sally. In the sentence Before her arrival, nobody saw Sally, the pronoun her refers forward to the postcedent Sally, so her is now a cataphor (and an anaphor in the broader, but not the narrower, sense). Usually, an anaphoric expression is a pro-form or some other kind of deictic (contextually dependent) expression. Both anaphora and cataphora are species of endophora, referring to something mentioned elsewhere in a dialog or text. Anaphora is an important concept for different reasons and on different levels: first, anaphora indicates how discourse is constructed and maintained; second, anaphora binds different syntactical elements together at the level of the sentence; third, anaphora presents a challenge to natural language processing in computational linguistics, since the identification of the reference can be difficult; and fourth, anaphora partially reveals how language is understood and processed, which is relevant to fields of linguistics interested in cognitive psychology. So dient sie der Strukturierung und Rhythmisierung von Texten. Die wiederholten Einheiten werden ggf. als besonders bedeutsam hervorgehoben. Die Anapher zählt zu den einfachsten, ältesten und häufigsten rhetorischen und poetischen Stilmitteln. Sie begegnet besonders häufig in religiöser Sprache, etwa in der Bibel. Spiegelbildliches Gegenstück zur Anapher ist die Epipher; nahe verwandt mit beiden sind Anadiplose und Kyklos. L’anaphore rythme la phrase, souligne un mot, une obsession, provoque un effet musical, communique plus d’énergie au discours ou renforce une affirmation, un plaidoyer, suggère une incantation, une urgence. Syntaxiquement, elle permet de créer un effet de symétrie. The term anaphora is actually used in two ways. In a broad sense, it denotes the act of referring. Any time a given expression (e.g. a pro-form) refers to another contextual entity, anaphora is present. In a second, narrower sense, the term anaphora denotes the act of referring backwards in a dialog or text, such as referring to the left when an anaphor points to its left toward its antecedent in languages that are written from left to right. Etymologically, anaphora derives from Ancient Greek ἀναφορά (anaphorá, "a carrying back"), from ἀνά (aná, "up") + φέρω (phérō, "I carry"). In this narrow sense, anaphora stands in contrast to cataphora, which sees the act of referring forward in a dialog or text, or pointing to the right in languages that are written from left to right: Ancient Greek καταφορά (kataphorá, "a downward motion"), from κατά (katá, "downwards") + φέρω (phérō, "I carry"). A pro-form is a cataphor when it points to its right toward its postcedent. Both effects together are called either anaphora (broad sense) or less ambiguously, along with self-reference they comprise the category of endophora. Examples of anaphora (in the narrow sense) and cataphora are given next.  Giotto:
„So klein, so fein, so Giotto.“ — Giotto
→ Die Betonung von „so“ stellt eine Verbindung zwischen den Adjektiven und der Süßigkeit her. Außerdem werden sie gesteigert.

Anapher – Wirkung 

Wie du an den Beispielen siehst, entfaltet die Anapher eine bestimmte Wirkung auf den Leser. Je nach Kontext kann sie verschiedene Funktionen haben.

Verstärkung von Schlüsselbegriffen

Wenn bestimmte Wörter durch Anaphern wiederholt werden, lenkt das unsere Aufmerksamkeit auf sie und betont ihre Bedeutung.

In der Werbung wird die Wirkung von Anaphern genutzt, um bestimmte Botschaften zu verstärken und im Gedächtnis der Menschen zu bleiben. Insgesamt haben Anaphern also die Kraft, unsere Aufmerksamkeit zu lenken, bestimmte Botschaften zu verstärken, eine positive Verbindung zu erzeugen und eine emotionale Reaktion hervorzurufen. 

Rhythmisierung von Texten

Anaphern sind eine besondere sprachliche Technik, um einem Text einen rhythmischen Klang zu verleihen. Besonders in Gedichten ist das wichtig, um das Metrum einzuhalten. Das Metrum bezieht sich auf den Wechsel zwischen betonten und unbetonten Silben in den Versen eines Gedichts.

Dieser rhythmische Effekt kann dir helfen, das Gedicht besser zu verstehen und zu interpretieren. Wenn du auf die Anapher achtest, kannst du den besonderen Klang und die Bedeutung des Gedichts besser erfassen.

Inhaltliche Strukturierung

Anaphern sind nützliche Mittel, um einen Text zu gliedern und es leichter zu machen, den Inhalt zu verstehen.

Besonders in Reden, die oft lang und komplex sind, können Anaphern hilfreich sein. Durch diese Wiederholung wirken die Aussagen nämlich strukturiert, wodurch die Leser oder Zuhörer besser folgen können. 

Anapher Beispiel – Der Erlkönig

Du solltest dir bewusst sein, dass sich die drei Wirkungsweisen einer Anapher oft überschneiden und nicht immer klar voneinander abgrenzbar sind. Deshalb schauen wir uns nun das Beispiel einer Strophe des Gedichts „Der Erlkönig“  etwas genauer an:

Wer reitet so spät durch Nacht und Wind?
Es ist der Vater mit seinem Kind;
Er hat den Knaben wohl in dem Arm,
Er fasst ihn sicher, er hält ihn warm.

Anapher Beispiel – Wirkung Interpretation:

Die beschützende Rolle des Vaters wird durch eine die Verstärkung des Schlüsselbegriffs „Er“ in der ersten Strophe ausgedrückt. Dadurch kommt es auch zu einer inhaltlichen Strukturierung, da der Fokus direkt auf den Vater gelegt wird.

Die Wiederholung des Personalpronomens „Er“ betont die Nähe zwischen Vater und Sohn zu Beginn des Gedichts. Zudem kommt es zu einer Rhythmisierung des Textes, da der Text durch die Anapher melodischer klingt und zudem die Bindung zwischen Vater und Sohn verdeutlicht. 

Anapher Wirkung –  typische Formulierungen

Hier siehst du einige Formulierungshilfen, die du in deiner Interpretation als Inspiration verwenden kannst:

Die Anapher in Vers […] bewirkt, dass die Wörter hervorgehoben werden und dadurch leichter zu merken sind.

Dadurch wird die Bedeutung der Textstelle hervorgehoben und dem Leser gezeigt, dass …

Durch die Verwendung der Anapher in Zeile […] wird deutlich, dass die Begriffe inhaltlich zusammengehören. Daraus lässt sich schließen, dass…

Die Anapher unterstreicht den Rhythmus des Gedichts und betont…

Durch die mehrfache Verwendung des Stilmittels Anapher erzeugt der Autor / Dichter beim Leser das Gefühl, …

Die Anapher […] lenkt die Aufmerksamkeit auf… und führt dazu, dass…

Abgrenzung von anderen Stilmitteln

Es gibt verschiedene Stilmittel, die der Anapher sehr ähnlich sind. Sie gehören alle zum Feld der rhetorischen Mittel mit wörtlicher Wiederholung, die du als Repetitio bezeichnest. Deshalb zeigen wir dir jetzt die ähnlichen Stilmittel, damit du sie nicht verwechselst: 

Epipher:
Die Epipher ist das Gegenteil der Anapher: Hier findest du die Wiederholung am Satzende. Auch dabei kann es sich um einzelne oder mehrere Wörter handeln.
→ Wer sind die tausendmal tausend, / die myriadenmal hundert tausend — Klopstock: Die Frühlingsfeier

Anaphors and cataphors appear in bold, and their antecedents and postcedents are underlined: Anaphora (in the narrow sense, species of endophora)

a. Susan dropped the plate. It shattered loudly. – The pronoun it is an anaphor; it points to the left toward its antecedent the plate.

b. The music stopped, and that upset everyone. – The demonstrative pronoun that is an anaphor; it points to the left toward its antecedent The music stopped.

c. Fred was angry, and so was I. – The adverb so is an anaphor; it points to the left toward its antecedent angry.

d. If Sam buys a new bike, I shall do it as well. – The verb phrase do it is an anaphor; it points to the left toward its antecedent buys a new bike.

Cataphora (included in the broad sense of anaphora, species of endophora)

a. Because he was very cold, David put on his coat. – The pronoun he is a cataphor; it points to the right toward its postcedent David.

b. Although Sam might do so, I shall not buy a new bike. – The verb phrase do so is a cataphor; it points to the right toward its postcedent buy a new bike.

Читайте также:  Модальные глаголы в английском языке. презентация для учащихся 6-7 классов. На закрепление и правильного употребления в речи модальных глаголов

c. In their free time, the boys play video games. – The possessive adjective their is a cataphor; it points to the right toward its postcedent the boys.

A further distinction is drawn between endophoric and exophoric reference. Exophoric reference occurs when an expression, an exophor, refers to something that is not directly present in the linguistic context, but is rather present in the situational context. Deictic pro-forms are stereotypical exophors, e.g.

Exophora

a. This garden hose is better than that one. – The demonstrative adjectives this and that are exophors; they point to entities in the situational context.

b. Jerry is standing over there. – The adverb there is an exophor; it points to a location in the situational context.

Exophors cannot be anaphors as they do not substantially refer within the dialog or text, though there is a question of what portions of a conversation or document are accessed by a listener or reader with regard to whether all references to which a term points within that language stream are noticed (i.e., if you hear only a fragment of what someone says using the pronoun her, you might never discover who she is, though if you heard the rest of what the speaker was saying on the same occasion, you might discover who she is, either by anaphoric revelation or by exophoric implication because you realize who she must be according to what else is said about her even if her identity is not explicitly mentioned, as in the case of homophoric reference).

A listener might, for example, realize through listening to other clauses and sentences that she is a Queen because of some of her attributes or actions mentioned. But which queen? Homophoric reference occurs when a generic phrase obtains a specific meaning through knowledge of its context. For example, the referent of the phrase the Queen (using an emphatic definite article, not the less specific a Queen, but also not the more specific Queen Elizabeth) must be determined by the context of the utterance, which would identify the identity of the queen in question. Until further revealed by additional contextual words, gestures, images or other media, a listener would not even know what monarchy or historical period is being discussed, and even after hearing her name is Elizabeth does not know, even if an English-UK Queen Elizabeth becomes indicated, if this queen means Queen Elizabeth I or Queen Elizabeth II and must await further clues in additional communications. Similarly, in discussing ‘The Mayor’ (of a city), the Mayor’s identity must be understood broadly through the context which the speech references as general ‘object’ of understanding; is a particular human person meant, a current or future or past office-holder, the office in a strict legal sense, or the office in a general sense which includes activities a mayor might conduct, might even be expected to conduct, while they may not be explicitly defined for this office. Beispiele

„Aufgestanden ist er, welcher lange schlief,
Aufgestanden unten aus Gewölben tief. […]“

– Georg Heym: Der Krieg

„Scipio hat Numantia vernichtet, Scipio [hat] Karthago zerstört, und Scipio/er [hat] Frieden gebracht […]“

– Cicero

„Wer soll nun die Kinder lehren und die Wissenschaft vermehren?
Wer soll nun für Lämpel leiten seines Amtes Tätigkeiten?“

– Wilhelm Busch: Max und Moritz

„lies keine oden, mein sohn, lies die fahrpläne:
sie sind genauer. […]“WHAT IS ANAPHORA? DEFINITION, SENTENCE, & EXAMPLES

Anaphora is one of those figures of speech that you have already used quite often while speaking / writing, but you have no idea you did. “Hey! Don’t say that I don’t read. I read books, I read magazines, I read articles, I read a lot of things!” Ever said any such thing? If yes, you already know what anaphora is!

So, What is Anaphora?

Anaphora is a rhetorical device in English. It means “Repetition” in Greek. When you deliberately repeat a word or a phrase at the beginning of each word, neighboring clause, sentence, verse, or stanza of a poem, you are employing Anaphora. Anaphora is used to add emphasis.

In this article, we will discuss Anaphora in detail. If you are a literature student, this article is a must-read for you.

Meaning of Anaphora

Here’s how anaphora is pronounced: uh-naf-er-uh.

Anaphora is surprisingly common in both vocal & written literature. In fact, we employ Anaphora while speaking more often than you think.

So, is any repetition of words in a sentence an anaphora? No, not in a sentence but, at the beginning of successive clauses, phrases, or lines to create an artistic effect.

Consider an example:

Alice: Hey, how did you manage to take your business so high?

Bob: I wish I had an easy answer to that question. I wish the process of business development was a straightforward & pain-free process.

Here, in Bob’s answer, both sentences begin with the phrase ‘I wish’. This repetition of ‘I wish’ emphasizes how much hard work Bob had to put in for his business.

You will notice the use of anaphora in political speeches, poetry, and song, creating a sonic effect & not just an artistic effect. Anaphora can engage, persuade, inspire, motivate, and encourage a reader or an audience.

Here’s the formal definition of Anaphora once again:

Anaphora is a rhetorical device in English. It means “Carrying Back / Carrying up or back” in Greek. When you deliberately repeat a word or a phrase at the beginning of each neighboring clause, sentence, verse, or stanza of a poem, you are employing Anaphora.

– Hans Magnus Enzensberger

„O Täler weit, o Höhen, o schöner, grüner Wald.“

– Joseph Freiherr von Eichendorff

„Wie ermüdend, geliebt zu werden, wahrhaft geliebt zu werden! Wie ermüdend, das Objekt emotionaler Belastungen eines anderen zu sein! Sich, wenn man sich frei, immer frei hat sehen wollen, mit einem Mal die Last der Verantwortung aufzubürden, Gefühle zu erwidern und so anständig zu sein, sich nicht zu entziehen, damit nur ja keiner auf den Gedanken kommt, man sei ein Prinz in Sachen Emotion und weise zugleich das Höchste zurück, das eine menschliche Seele zu geben vermag. Wie ermüdend, unsere Existenz ganz und gar abhängig zu sehen von der Gefühlsbeziehung zu einem anderen Menschen! Wie ermüdend, gezwungenermaßen ebenfalls ein bisschen lieben zu müssen, wenn auch ohne die volle Erwiderung!“

– Fernando Pessoa: Das Buch der Unruhe

Une anaphore consiste à répéter un ou des mot(s) identique(s) au début ou à la fin de vers ou de phrase.

L’anaphore en rhétorique est distinct de l’anaphore grammaticale, qui est un procédé de la langue consistant à utiliser un élément discursif (pronom, adverbe, adjectif, etc.) renvoyant à un constituant qui précède et qui est nécessaire à son identification et à son interprétation. Il s’agit avant tout d’un constituant contextuel comme dans :

« J’ai vu mon professeur, il avait l’air distrait. »

« Il » se rapporte à « professeur » et ne peut s’interpréter qu’en rapport à ce dernier.

On parle plutôt, afin d’éviter la confusion, de « relation anaphorique », d’« aes » ou de « déictiques anaphoriques ». De même, il existe une typologie d’anaphores différentes mais renvoyant toutes à la linguistique pure et non aux figures de style (voir les articles correspondants) comme : « anaphore lexicale », « anaphore associative » et « anaphore pronominale ». In generative grammar

See also: Binding (linguistics) and Government and binding theory

The term anaphor is used in a special way in the generative grammar tradition. Here it denotes what would normally be called a reflexive or reciprocal pronoun, such as himself or each other in English, and analogous forms in other languages. The use of the term anaphor in this narrow sense is unique to generative grammar, and in particular, to the traditional binding theory.[4] This theory investigates the syntactic relationship that can or must hold between a given pro-form and its antecedent (or postcedent). In this respect, anaphors (reflexive and reciprocal pronouns) behave very differently from, for instance, personal pronouns.

Complement anaphora

In some cases, anaphora may refer not to its usual antecedent, but to its complement set. In the following example a, the anaphoric pronoun they refers to the children who are eating the ice-cream. Contrastingly, example b has they seeming to refer to the children who are not eating ice-cream:

a. Only a few of the children ate their ice-cream. They ate the strawberry flavor first. – They meaning the children who ate ice-cream

b. Only a few of the children ate their ice-cream. They threw it around the room instead. – They meaning either the children who did not eat ice-cream or perhaps the children who did not eat ice-cream and some of those who ate ice-cream but did not finish it or who threw around the ice-cream of those who did not eat it, or even all the children, those who ate ice-cream throwing around part of their ice-cream, the ice-cream of others, the same ice-cream which they may have eaten before or after throwing it, or perhaps only some of the children so that they does not mean to be all-inclusive Débats

La tendance est de classer l’anaphore comme une figure de l’insistance ; or ce n’est pas décrire la nature de son fonctionnement linguistique et stylistique5.

Anaphore linguistique

Dans un extrait d’Amphitryon de Molière (acte II, sc. 1), Sosie évoque par anaphore un moi autre que lui-même. Véritable haute voltige du calembour, le jeu de mots repose sur des sèmes différents (le moi…) pour des signifiants grammaticalement et syntaxiquement distincts (… / pronom de rang premier6), mais orthographiquement et phonétiquement identiques [mwa] si on ne tient pas compte des variantes.

Devant tant de confusion (sic), ignorant les faits, le protagoniste du locuteur, Amphitryon, ne peut que conclure à l’aliénation mentale. Le spectateur, en revanche, – qui a vu Mercure rouer Sosie de coups pour usurper son identité – saisit à la fois tout le comique et le tragique de la situation : Sosie n’est plus lui-même ; l’autre a douloureusement pris « sa » place.

Notons que, formellement, l’anaphore satisfait à la règle de la redite rigoureusement identique (« Ce moi [qui] »), alors que la répétition propose, au contraire, des variantes : « m’ / moi-même / mon… » L’alternance en écho de l’une et de l’autre hisse cet extrait au niveau de la tragi-comédie.

Par cet exercice de style, Molière rejoint la notion de double et ouvre la voie au « Moi est un autre d’Arthur Rimbaud.

Cet extrait est analysé par le didacticiel en ligne BDstyle.ca7.

Anaphores stylistiques

Cette section est vide, insuffisamment détaillée ou incomplète. Votre aide est la bienvenue ! Comment faire ?

Exemples

« Patience, patience,
Patience dans l’azur !
Chaque atome de silence
Est la chance d’un fruit mûr ! »

— Paul Valéry, Palme dans Charmes

« Rome, l’unique objet de mon ressentiment !
Rome, à qui vient ton bras d’immoler mon amant !
Rome qui t’a vu naître, et que ton cœur adore !
Rome enfin que je hais parce qu’elle t’honore ! »

— Corneille, Camille dans Horaceacte IV, scène 5

« Mon bras, qu’avec respect toute l’Espagne admire,
Mon bras, qui tant de fois a sauvé cet empire »

— Corneille, Le Cidacte I, scène 4

« Ils étaient vingt et trois quand les fusils fleurirent
Vingt et trois qui donnaient le cœur avant le temps
Vingt et trois étrangers et nos frères pourtant
Vingt et trois amoureux de vivre à en mourir
Vingt et trois qui criaient la France en s’abattant »

— Louis Aragon, Strophes pour se souvenir

« Et la mer et l’amour ont l’amer pour partage,
Et la mer est amère, et l’amour est amer (…)
Celui qui craint les eaux, qu’il demeure au rivage,
Celui qui craint les maux qu’on souffre pour aimer,
Qu’il ne se laisse pas à l’amour enflammer (…) »

— Pierre de Marbeuf, Sonnet, Poètes français de l’âge baroque, Anthologie (1571-1677)

« Adieu tristesse
Bonjour tristesse
Tu es inscrite dans les lignes du plafond
Tu es inscrite dans les yeux que j’aime »

— Paul Éluard, À peine défigurée dans La vie immédiate

« Plus me plaît le séjour qu’ont bâti mes aïeux,
Que des palais romains le front audacieux,
Plus que le marbre dur me plaît l’ardoise fine,
Plus mon Loir gaulois, que le Tibre latin,
Plus mon petit Liré, que le mont Palatin,
Et plus que l’air marin la douceur angevine. »

— Joachim du Bellay, Heureux qui, comme Ulysse, a fait un beau voyage… dans Les Regrets

Let’s break it down in simple words with the help of examples:

Example

Description

“I came, I saw, I conquered.” – Julius Caesar
[Original (Latin): Veni, vidi, vici]

Every clause starts with the word “I”.

“Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina,
go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums…”
– “I Have a Dream” speech by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Every clause starts with the phrase “Go back to”.

“I wish I had an easy answer to that question. I wish the process of business development was a straightforward & pain-free process.”

The phrase “I wish” has been repeated at the beginning of two consecutive sentences for added dramatic effect.

“… And needy nothing trimm’d in jollity,
And purest faith unhappily forsworn,
And gilded honour shamefully misplac’d,
And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted,
And right perfection wrongfully disgrac’d,
And strength by limping sway disabled,
And art made tongue-tied by authority,
And folly, doctor-like, controlling skill,
And simple truth miscall’d simplicity,
And captive good attending captain ill….”
– Sonnet 66: Tir’d with all these, for restful death I cry, William Shakespeare

Every line in the poetry here (10 lines out of the 14 lines in the sonnet) begins with the word “And”.

The voice of the Lord is over the waters;
the God of glory thunders,
the Lord, over many waters.
The voice of the Lord is powerful;
the voice of the Lord is full of majesty.

The voice of the Lord breaks the cedars;
the Lord breaks the cedars of Lebanon.
He makes Lebanon to skip like a calf,
and Sirion like a young wild ox.

The voice of the Lord flashes forth flames of fire.
The voice of the Lord shakes the wilderness;
the Lord shakes the wilderness of Kadesh.

The voice of the Lord makes the deer give birth
and strips the forests bare,
and in his temple all cry, “Glory!”
— Psalm 29:3–9

Every stanza begins with the phrase “The voice of the Lord”.

Читайте также:  Чтение английских глассных

Explaining the Usage of Anaphora in a sentence

Example of Anaphora in daily life

After the explanation, the below examples of anaphora will clarify the anaphora effect this figure of speech brings in.

“Every morning, I jog. Every evening, I go for a walk. Every night, I read in bed. This is the happiest phase of my life.”

“Everything is gone. Everything is ruined.”

“I was there that morning. I saw everything. I saw every little thing!”

Examples of Anaphora in Literature 

In English literature, anaphora is used to create an artistic effect and sonic effect. Here are some examples:

The Song “Every Breath You Take” by The Rock Band “The Police“

“Every breath you take

Every move you make

Every bond you break

Every step you take

I’ll be watching you…”

“The Tyger” Poem By William Blake

“What the hammer? What is the chain?

In what furnace was thy brain?

What anvil? what dread grasp

Dare its deadly terrors to clasp?”

Sara Bareilles, “She Used to Be Mine”

“… She‘s imperfect, but she tries
She is good, but she lies
She is hard on herself
She is broken and won’t ask for help
She is messy, but she’s kind
She is lonely most of the time
She is all of this mixed up and baked in a beautiful pie
She is gone, but she used to be mine …

…..

And carves out a person
And makes you believe it’s all true
And now I’ve got you
And you’re not what I asked for…”

Dare its deadly terrors to clasp?”

“A Tale of Two Cities” by Charles Dickens

“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times,

it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness,

it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity,

it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness,

it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair …,

we had nothing before us,

we were all going direct to Heaven,

we were all going direct the other way …”

“Santa Claus Is Comin’ to Town” lyrics by Haven Gillespie

“You better watch out,

You better not cry,

You better not pout……

He sees you when you’re sleeping
He knows when you’re awake
He knows if you’ve been bad or good…”

“Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey, on revisiting the banks of the Wye during a Tour. July 13, 1798” lyrics by William Wordsworth

“Five years have past; five summers, with the length
Of five long winters!…”

Significance of Anaphora

Anaphora means repetition of words in the sentence, it’s a figurative speech that functions in everyday speech and rhetorics. As you must have observed in the above examples, it serves to emphasize certain ideas and portray the emotions by inspiring the audience or a reader.

Here is the significance of Anaphora as a Rhetorical Device in English Literature:

Anaphora has been a part of Religious & Devotional Literature.

By adding anaphora to a passage it allows for a piece of reading which is memorable and enjoyable. It is a powerful way to root your words in the reader’s mind. Thus, your readers or listeners start to participate by anticipating what might come next.

« Si les vers ont été l’abus de ma jeunesse,
Les vers seront aussi l’appui de ma vieillesse,
S’ils furent ma folie, ils seront ma raison,

S’ils furent ma blessure, ils seront mon Achille,
S’ils furent mon venin, le scorpion utile
Qui sera de mon mal la seule guérison. »

— Joachim du Bellay, Maintenant je pardonne à la douce fureur… dans Les Regrets

« Afrique mon Afrique
Afrique des fiers guerriers dans les savanes ancestrales
Afrique que chante ma grand-mère
Au bord de son fleuve lointain
Je ne t’ai jamais connue »

— David Diop, Afrique dans Je est un autre, Anthologie des plus beaux poèmes sur l’étranger en soi présentée par Bruno Doucey et Christian Poslaniec

« Mon âme est malade aujourd’hui,
Mon âme est malade d’absences,
Mon âme a le mal des silences,
Et mes yeux l’éclairent d’ennui. »

— Maurice Maeterlinck, Chasses lasses dans Serres chaudes

« Moi, j’attends un peu de réveil,
Moi, j’attends que le sommeil passe,
Moi, j’attends un peu de soleil
Sur mes mains que la lune glace. »

— Maurice Maeterlinck, Heures ternes dans Serres chaudes

« Salut aux humiliés, aux émigrés, aux exilés sur leur propre terre qui veulent vivre et vivre libres.
Salut à celles et à ceux qu’on bâillonne, qu’on persécute ou qu’on torture, qui veulent vivre et vivre libres.
Salut aux séquestrés, aux disparus et aux assassinés, qui voulaient seulement vivre et vivre libres.
Salut aux prêtres brutalisés, aux syndicalistes emprisonnés, aux chômeurs qui vendent leur sang pour survivre, aux indiens pourchassés dans leur forêt, aux travailleurs sans droit, aux paysans sans terre, aux résistants sans armes qui veulent vivre et vivre libres. »

— Discours de M. François Mitterrand, Président de la République française, devant le monument de la Révolution à Mexico, mardi 20 octobre 1981 (Discours dit de Cancun)

« Paris ! Paris outragé ! Paris brisé ! Paris martyrisé ! Mais Paris libéré ! »

— Charles de Gaulle, extrait du discours du 25 août 1944, à la suite de la libération de Paris

« Où sous un clair azur tout n’est qu’amour et joie,
Où Où tout ce que l’on aime est digne d’être aimé,
Où dans la volupté pure le cœur se noie ! »

— Baudelaire, Moesta et errabunda dans Les Fleurs du mal, v.17 à v.20

Dans la prose : « Marcher à jeun, marcher vaincu, marcher malade » (Victor Hugo)

Dans la première strophe de l’Internationale, la répétition de debout (reprise dans le sixième vers) est une anaphore.

Le 2 mai 2012, dans le débat de l’entre-deux-tours de l’élection présidentielle avec Nicolas Sarkozy, François Hollande a utilisé une anaphore devenue célèbre, « Moi président de la République ». In its narrower definition, an anaphoric pronoun must refer to some noun (phrase) that has already been introduced into the discourse. In complement anaphora cases, however, the anaphor refers to something that is not yet present in the discourse, since the pronoun’s referent has not been formerly introduced, including the case of ‘everything but’ what has been introduced. The set of ice-cream-eating-children in example b is introduced into the discourse, but then the pronoun they refers to the set of non-ice-cream-eating-children, a set which has not been explicitly mentioned.

Both semantic and pragmatics considerations attend this phenomenon, which following discourse representation theory since the early 1980s, such as work by Kamp (1981) and Heim (File Change Semantics, 1982), and generalized quantifier theory, such as work by Barwise and Cooper (1981), was studied in a series of psycholinguistic experiments in the early 1990s by Moxey and Sanford (1993) and Sanford et al. (1994). In complement anaphora as in the case of the pronoun in example b, this anaphora refers to some sort of complement set (i.e. only to the set of non-ice-cream-eating-children) or to the maximal set (i.e. to all the children, both ice-cream-eating-children and non-ice-cream-eating-children) or some hybrid or variant set, including potentially one of those noted to the right of example b. The various possible referents in complement anaphora are discussed by Corblin (1996), Kibble (1997), and Nouwen (2003). Resolving complement anaphora is of interest in shedding light on brain access to information, calculation, mental modeling, communication.

Anaphora resolution – centering theory

There are many theories that attempt to prove how anaphors are related and trace back to their antecedents, with centering theory (Grosz, Joshi, and Weinstein 1983) being one of them. Taking the computational theory of mind view of language, centering theory gives a computational analysis of underlying antecedents. In their original theory, Grosz, Joshi, & Weinstein (1983) propose that some discourse entities in utterances are more "central" than others, and this degree of centrality imposes constraints on what can be the antecedent. Anapher

Du willst wissen, was eine Anapher ist? In unserem Beitrag erklären wir dir das Stilmittel und seine Wirkung mit vielen Beispielen. Schau dir auch gleich unser Video zum Thema an! 

Inhaltsübersicht

Was ist eine Anapher?

Die Anapher (griechisch: Rückbeziehung) ist ein rhetorisches Stilmittel. Dabei werden Wörter am Anfang von aufeinanderfolgenden Sätzen, Satzteilen, Strophen oder Versen ein- oder mehrmals wiederholt. Hier siehst du ein Beispiel für eine Anapher:

„Das Wasser rauscht‘, das Wasser schwoll, / Ein Fischer saß daran“ — Goethes Ballade „Der Fischer“

Anaphern haben die Wirkung, dass Texte rhythmischer und strukturierter wirken. Außerdem können dadurch bestimmte Wörter hervorgehoben werden.

Du begegnest Anaphern in verschiedenen Bereichen:

in der Literatur

in der Rhetorik (z. B. in Reden)

und in der Werbung.

Anapher – Definition 

Die Anapher ist ein rhetorisches Stilmittel der Wortwiederholung. Das bedeutet, dass ein Wort oder mehrere Wörter am Anfang aufeinander folgender Sätze wiederholt werden. Dabei kann es sich um Satzteile, Strophen oder Verse handeln.

Anapher – Beispiele

An verschiedenen Beispielen verstehst du schnell, wie du eine Anapher erkennen kannst. Dieses rhetorische Mittel kommt nämlich in einigen Bereichen vor. 

Anapher Beispiele in der Literatur 

In der Literatur findest du Anaphern in Texten aus allen Epochen und Gattungen, da es sich um ein besonders beliebtes Stilmittel handelt. 

Bibel:
Schon in der Bibel kommen Anaphern an vielen Stellen vor. Meistens soll damit etwas besonders betont werden. Es entsteht außerdem eine feierliche Wirkung, wie bei einem Gebet.
→ „Selig sind, die da geistlich arm sind; denn ihrer ist das Himmelreich.
Selig sind, die da Leid tragen; denn sie sollen getröstet werden.
Selig sind die Sanftmütigen; denn sie werden das Erdreich besitzen.“ — Matthäusevangelium 

Gedichte:
Auch in Gedichten begegnet dir das Stilmittel. Dort bewirkt es oft eine besondere Betonung auf den Rhythmus.
→ „Ich hör die Bächlein rauschen / Im Walde her und hin, / Im Walde in dem Rauschen / Ich weiß nicht, wo ich bin.“ — Eichendorff: In der Fremde

Drama:
In Dramen kann die Wiederholung einen Einfluss auf die Stimmung haben. 
→ “Pfui über allen Tod! Durch Schwert, durch Feuer, durch Gift, durch Strick, durch Beil. Pfui allem Tod!“ — Grillparzer: Ein treuer Diener seines Herrn 

Anapher Beispiel – Der Zauberlehrling:

Besonders bekannt ist ein Beispiel aus Goethes Gedicht „Der Zauberlehrling“.

„Walle! walle
manche Strecke,
daß, zum Zwecke,
Wasser fließe
und mit reichem, vollem Schwalle
zu dem Bade sich ergieße.

Stehe! stehe!
denn wir haben
deiner Gaben
vollgemessen! –
Ach, ich merk es! Wehe! wehe!
Hab ich doch das Wort vergessen!“

In diesem Fall erzeugen die Anaphern eine beschwörende Stimmung. Später wirkt die Wortwiederholung aber zunehmend verzweifelt. 

Anapher Beispiele in der Rhetorik

Ursprünglich ist das Stilmittel der Wiederholung in der Rhetorik entstanden, also der Redekunst. Da es sich um eine wirkungsvolle rhetorische Figur handelt, findest du sie in vielen Reden aus verschiedenen Epochen.

Wir müssen die Vergangenheit annehmen (Weizäcker, 1985):
„Wir gedenken heute in Trauer aller Toten des Krieges und der Gewaltherrschaft. Wir gedenken insbesondere der sechs Millionen Juden […].“
→ Das anaphorische „wir gedenken“ wirkt hier bedeutend und eindringlich. 

Dreikönigsrede (Lindner, 2017):
„Wehe, die Parkuhr ist abgelaufen, wehe, die Steuererklärung wird zu spät abgegeben; wehe, man sortiert den Müll falsch; wehe man baut auf Sylt eine Sandburg, das ist verboten – Stolpergefahr.
Das ist kein Witz: Das ist Deutschland.“ 
→ Der Politiker möchte durch die Anapher hervorheben, was er an der Verbotskultur in Deutschland kritisiert.

Читайте также:  Урок английского языка в 6 классе по теме "Может, посмотрим что-нибудь?" ( How about?)

Eisenhower, 1953:
„Jede Kanone, die gebaut wird, jedes Kriegsschiff, das vom Stapel gelassen wird, jede abgefeuerte Rakete bedeutet letztlich einen Diebstahl an denen, die hungern und nichts zu Essen bekommen, denen, die frieren und keine Kleidung haben.“ — Eisenhower (ehemaliger US-Präsident)
→ Eisenhower möchte hervorheben, dass Entwicklungshilfe wichtiger und sinnvoller ist als die Herstellung von Waffen. 

Merkel, 2015:
„Wir haben so vieles geschafft, wir schaffen das. Wir schaffen das! Und wo uns etwas im Wege steht, muss es überwunden werden“ — Angela Merkel 
→ Merkel appelliert mit dem wiederholten „wir“ an das Zusammengehörigkeitsgefühl der Bürger. 

Anapher Beispiele im Alltag

Im Alltag hast du Anaphern vielleicht schon einmal in der Werbung bemerkt. Dort werden sie oft eingesetzt, um etwas zu betonen und es im Gedächtnis bleiben zu lassen:

Carglass:
„Carglass repariert, Carglass tauscht aus.“ — Carglass 
→ Hier wird der Markenname der Autoglasfirma besonders betont. 

JET Tankstellen:
„Jet Kraftstoff ist nicht gerade aufregend: Immer gleich hohe Qualität, immer penibel kontrolliert und immer gleich gut zum Motor.“ — JET Tankstellen
→ Mit der Wiederholung als Stilmittel soll die gleichbleibende, konstante Leistung hervorgehoben werden.

Symploke:
Eine Kombination aus Anapher und Epipher nennst du Symploke oder Complexio. Ein Wort wird zu Beginn eines Satzes wiederholt, ein anderes am Ende. Dieses Stilmittel ist aber sehr selten. 
→ Alles geben die Götter, die unendlichen, / […] Alle Freuden, die unendlichen, / alle Schmerzen, die unendlichen — Goethe: Alles geben die Götter

Anadiplose:
Auch die Anadiplose bezeichnet eine Wortwiederholung. In diesem Fall wird das letzte Wort eines Satzes zu Beginn des nächsten Satzes wiederholt. 
→ Mit dem Schiffe spielen Wind und Wellen,
Wind und Wellen nicht mit seinem Herzen. — Goethe: Seefahrt

Kyklos:
Ein Kyklos ist die Wiederholung eines Wortes am Anfang und am Ende eines Satzes oder Abschnitts. Wie ein Rahmen umschließt das Stilmittel den Satz. 
→ Entbehren sollst du! Sollst entbehren! — Goethe: Faust I

Anapher Beispiel – wissenschaftliche Arbeiten

In einer wissenschaftlichen Arbeit solltest du Anaphern vermeiden, da sie durch die Wiederholung von Wörtern am Satzanfang schnell etwas eintönig wirken können.

Schau dir dazu ein Beispiel an:

✗ Mit Anapher (nicht empfohlen):
Es werden zunächst unterschiedliche Beispiele präsentiert. Es werden anschließend die jeweiligen Ergebnisse vorgestellt. Es wird aufgezeigt, was die Ergebnisse für die praktische Arbeit bedeuten.

✓ Ohne Anapher (empfohlen):
Es werden zuerst verschiedene Beispiele vorgestellt und dann deren Ergebnisse wiedergegeben. Anschließend wird gezeigt, welche Bedeutung diese Ergebnisse für die praktische Anwendung haben können.

Wie du im Beispiel siehst, kannst du Anaphern vermeiden, indem du die Sätze miteinander verbindest oder umstellst. Dein Text liest sich dann viel flüssiger und abwechslungsreicher.

In wissenschaftlichen Arbeiten ist es wichtig, eine klare und gut strukturierte Sprache zu verwenden. So kannst du deine Argumente und Ergebnisse genau erklären. Indem du Anaphern vermeidest, kannst du deinen Text ansprechend und verständlich gestalten.

Stilmittel

Sehr gut! Jetzt weißt du, was eine Anapher ist und welche Wirkung sie hat. Du möchtest noch mehr Stilmittel kennenlernen? Dann solltest du dir unbedingt unser Video mit noch mehr Beispielen und Erklärungen anschauen!

In the theory, there are different types of centers: forward facing, backwards facing, and preferred.

Forward facing centers

A ranked list of discourse entities in an utterance. The ranking is debated, some focusing on theta relations (Yıldırım et al. 2004) and some providing definitive lists.

Backwards facing center

The highest ranked discourse entity in the previous utterance.

Preferred center

The highest ranked discourse entity in the previous utterance realised in the current utterance.

Antecedent – Expression that gives its meaning to a pro-form in grammar

Binding – Distribution of anaphoric elements

Coreference – Two or more expressions in a text with the same referent

Donkey sentence – Sentence containing a pronoun with clear meaning but unclear syntactic role

Echo complement

Endophora – Expressions that derive their reference from something within the surrounding text

Exophora – Reference to something not in the immediate text

Generic antecedent – Representatives of classes in a situation in which gender is typically unknown

Logophoricity – Binding relation that may employ a morphologically different set of anaphoric forms

Modal subordination – A phenomenon sometimes viewed as modal or temporal anaphora

Pro-form – Word or form that substitutes for another word

Définitions stylistiques

Les effets de l’anaphore sont variés et dépendent de l’intention du locuteur. Ils sont avant tout proches de ceux recherchés dans le phénomène du refrain ou de la répétition :

surprise, énumération, symétrie de forme (lorsque la localisation des mots répétés est toujours la même, en début de vers par exemple comme dans les chansons) ;

litanie et incantation dans la littérature religieuse ou solennelle (le Sermon sur la montagne de Saint Matthieu, par exemple, avec l’exclamation « Heureux » répétée neuf fois, ou le I have a dream de Martin Luther King) ;

l’urgence d’un appel (J’accuse de Émile Zola) ;

une volonté de convaincre par accumulation (voir plus bas, l’anaphore de François Hollande).

Le sentiment recherché est aussi et surtout, en poésie, la mélancolie ou la tristesse (voir les exemples de Louis Aragon, Paul Éluard ou Joachim du Bellay).

Parce que l’homme devient sa pensée, la répétition d’une idée influe sur l’être. À force de répéter un mot, ce mot s’ancrera dans l’esprit de l’individu pour finalement influer sur son existence. C’est le principe de la propagande. Une idée répétée maintes et maintes fois apparaîtra comme vraie pour l’individu. Ce procédé est aussi utilisé pour la publicité par exemple.

Genres concernés

L’anaphore est une figure généralisée à tout le domaine littéraire, avec un emploi beaucoup plus ancien d’une part, et plus privilégié d’autre part, en poésie.

De même, elle est utilisée dans les discours très couramment, notamment dans les discours politiques, proches des oraisons rhétoriques classiques 1,2. Par exemple, l’anaphore de François Hollande prononcée lors du débat télévisé du second tour de l’élection présidentielle française de 2012 a été particulièrement remarquée3,2.

L’anaphore est une figure traduisible dans les arts :

au cinéma, c’est la reprise de la même image ou même scène, proche du déjà-vu ;

en musique, ce sont des accords répétés, un leitmotiv ou un refrain vocal ;

en peinture, ce sont des copiés-collés d’un même détail ou d’une couleur, dans un effet de symétrie par exemple.

Historique de la notion

Elle est une des figures les plus anciennes de la rhétorique, car elle est utilisée par les orateurs en premier lieu. L’auteur anonyme de La Rhétorique à Herennius (premier siècle avant notre ère) la donne en exemple comme procédé pour donner du brillant au style : « L’anaphore consiste, pour des idées analogues ou différentes, à employer le même mot en tête de plusieurs propositions qui se suivent ; par exemple : C’est à vous qu’il faut attribuer cette action, à vous qu’il en faut rendre grâce, à vous que votre conduite rapportera de l’honneur » (Livre IV). Un rhéteur moderne comme André Malraux saura s’en souvenir dans son discours prononcé lors du transfert des cendres de Jean Moulin au Panthéon : (« Entre ici, Jean Moulin »).

Les ballades du Moyen Âge usent souvent des anaphores pour imprimer un rythme jovial au poème (Christine de Pisan par exemple). L’anaphore est une figure privilégiée de la poésie: chez Rimbaud surtout, dans son objectif de rendre musical le poème4, dans L’expiation de Victor Hugo avec l’expression « il neigeait », chez Guillaume Apollinaire dans Poèmes à Lou avec « Il y a ». Les poètes modernes, nés des mouvements expérimentaux comme l’Oulipo l’emploient de manière rythmique, sous l’influence de la chanson populaire ou du blues, ainsi Georges Perec avec Je me souviens.

Dans le brouillard s’en vont un paysan cagneux
Et son bœuf
Dans le brouillard s’en vont deux silhouettes grises

— Guillaume Apollinaire, Alcools, Automne

Figures proches

Figure mère

Figure fille

répétition

Symploque

Antonyme

Paronyme

Synonyme

épiphore, acrostiche, palilogie

anaphore (grammaire)

Литература и источники

^ Tognini-Bonelli (2001:70) writes that "an anaphor is a linguistic entity which indicates a referential tie to some other linguistic entity in the same text".

^ The four ways just listed in which anaphora is important for linguistics are from McEnery (2000:3).

^ Concerning the term endophora, see Bussmann et al. (1998:58f.).

^ The traditional binding theory is associated above all with Chomsky’s analysis from the early 1980s (Chomsky 1981).

^ See Büring (2005) for an introduction to and discussion of anaphors (in the sense of generative grammar) in the traditional binding theory.

^ Jump up to:a b Nobuaki, Akagi; Ursini, Francesco-Alessio (2011). The Interpretation of Complement Anaphora: The Case of The Others. Proceedings of Australasian Language Technology Association Workshop. pp. 131–139. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 28 July 2015.

^ Jump up to:a b Nouwen, Rick (2003). "Complement Anaphora and Interpretation". Journal of Semantics. 20 (1): 73–113. doi:10.1093/jos/20.1.73.

Moxey, L; Sanford, A (1993). "Communicating quantities: A psychological perspective". Laurence Erlbaum Associates.

Kotek, Hadas. "Resolving Complement Anaphora" (PDF). SSN 1736-6305 Vol. 2. Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Anaphora Resolution (2008). Retrieved 28 July 2015.

Garnham, A (2001). Mental models and the interpretation of anaphora. Hove, UK: Psychology Press.

Büring, Daniel (2005). Binding theory. Cambridge Textbooks in Linguistics. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 978-0-521-81280-1.

Bussmann, H., G. Trauth, and K. Kazzazi 1998. Routledge dictionary of language and linguistics. Taylor and Francis.

Chomsky, N. 1981/1993. Lectures on government and binding: The Pisa lectures. Mouton de Gruyter.

Corblin, F. 1996. "Quantification et anaphore discursive: la reference aux comple-mentaires". Linguages. 123, 51–74.

Grosz, Barbara J.; Joshi, Aravind K.; and Weinstein, Scott (1983). "Providing a unified account of definite noun phrases in discourse". In Proceedings, 21st Annual Meeting of the Association of Computational Linguistics. 44–50.

Kibble, R. 1997. "Complement anaphora and dynamic binding". In Proceedings from Semantics and Linguistic Theory VII, ed. A. Lawson, 258–275. Ithaca, New York: Cornell University.

McEnery, T. 2000. Corpus-based and computational approaches to discourse anaphora. John Benjamins.

Moxey, L. and A. Sanford 1993. Communicating quantities: A psychological perspective. Laurence Erlbaum Associates.

Nouwen, R. 2003. "Complement anaphora and interpretation". Journal of Semantics, 20, 73–113.

Sanford, A., L. Moxey and K. Patterson 1994. "Psychological studies of quantifiers". Journal of Semantics 11, 153–170.

Schmolz, H. 2015. Anaphora Resolution and Text Retrieval. A Linguistic Analysis of Hypertexts. De Gruyter.

Tognini-Bonelli, E. 2001. Corpus linguistics at work. John Benjamins.

Yıldırım, Savaş & Kiliçaslan, Yilmaz & Erman Aykaç, R. 2004. A Computational Model for Anaphora Resolution in Turkish via Centering Theory: an Initial Approach. 124–128.

King, Jeffrey C. "Anaphora". In Zalta, Edward N. (ed.). Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. What is anaphora?

↑ « Texte : Mesurer l’anaphore (1) [Technologies du Langage] [archive] », sur aixtal.blogspot.com (consulté le 8 mai 2023).

↑ Revenir plus haut en :a et b Pierre Assouline, « De l’efficacité de l’anaphore » [archive] (à propos du débat télévisé du 2 mai 2012 pour l’élection présidentielle française), billet de blog sur le site du quotidien Le Monde

↑ Daniel Schneidermann, « Et la petite phrase fut… une anaphore » [archive] (à propos du débat télévisé du 2 mai 2012 pour l’élection présidentielle française) sur le site d’information Arrêt sur images.

↑ « Anaphore [archive] », sur abardel.free.fr (consulté le 8 mai 2023).

↑ Michel Charolles, L’anaphore : problèmes de définition et de classification

↑ Joseph Soltész, « Nombre grammatical et système du nombre en français », Cahier de linguistique, no 7,‎ 1978, p. 89–135 (ISSN 0315-4025 et 1920-1346, DOI https://doi.org/10.7202/800055ar, lire en ligne [archive], consulté le 15 mai 2020)

↑ « Répétition | BD style [archive] » (consulté le 15 mai 2020)

Épanalepse

Épiphore

Symploque

Litanie

Pierre Pellegrin (dir.) et Myriam Hecquet-Devienne, Aristote : Œuvres complètes, Éditions Flammarion, 2014, 2923 p. (ISBN 978-2081273160), « Réfutations sophistiques », p. 457. 

Анафора в английском, немецком и французском языках.

Quintilien (trad. Jean Cousin), De l’Institution oratoire, t. I, Paris, Les Belles Lettres, coll. « Budé Série Latine », 1989, 392 p. (ISBN 2-2510-1202-8).

Antoine Fouquelin, La Rhétorique françoise, Paris, A. Wechel, 1557 (ASIN B001C9C7IQ).

César Chesneau Dumarsais, Des tropes ou Des différents sens dans lesquels on peut prendre un même mot dans une même langue, Impr. de Delalain, 1816 (réimpr. Nouvelle édition augmentée de la Construction oratoire, par l’abbé Batteux), 362 p. (ASIN B001CAQJ52, lire en ligne [archive]).

Pierre Fontanier, Les Figures du discours, Paris, Flammarion, 1977 (ISBN 2-0808-1015-4, lire en ligne [archive]).

Patrick Bacry, Les Figures de style et autres procédés stylistiques, Paris, Belin, coll. « Collection Sujets », 1992, 335 p. (ISBN 2-7011-1393-8).

Bernard Dupriez, Gradus, les procédés littéraires, Paris, 10/18, coll. « Domaine français », 2003, 540 p. (ISBN 2-2640-3709-1).

Catherine Fromilhague, Les Figures de style, Paris, Armand Colin, coll. « 128 Lettres », 2010 (1re  éd. nathan, 1995), 128 p. (ISBN 978-2-2003-5236-3).

Georges Molinié et Michèle Aquien, Dictionnaire de rhétorique et de poétique, Paris, LGF — Livre de Poche, coll. « Encyclopédies d’aujourd’hui », 1996, 350 p. (ISBN 2-2531-3017-6).

Michel Pougeoise, Dictionnaire de rhétorique, Paris, Armand Colin, 2001, 228 p., 16 cm × 24 cm (ISBN 978-2-2002-5239-7).

Olivier Reboul, Introduction à la rhétorique, Paris, Presses universitaires de France, coll. « Premier cycle », 1991, 256 p., 15 cm × 22 cm (ISBN 2-1304-3917-9).

Hendrik Van Gorp, Dirk Delabastita, Georges Legros, Rainier Grutman et al., Dictionnaire des termes littéraires, Paris, Honoré Champion, 2005, 533 p. (ISBN 978-2-7453-1325-6).

Groupe µ, Rhétorique générale, Paris, Larousse, coll. « Langue et langage », 1970.

Nicole Ricalens-Pourchot, Dictionnaire des figures de style, Paris, Armand Colin, 2003, 218 p. (ISBN 2-200-26457-7).

Michel Jarrety (dir.), Lexique des termes littéraires, Paris, Le Livre de poche, 2010, 475 p. (ISBN 978-2-253-06745-0).

Michel Charolles, L’anaphore : problèmes de définition et de classification, Verbum, 1991, p. 203-215

Denis Apothéloz, Rôle et fonctionnement de l’anaphore dans la dynamique textuelle, Genève, Librairie Droz, 1995.

Sur les autres projets Wikimedia :

Anaphore, sur le Wiktionnaire

anaphore [archive], Office québécois de la langue française.

16

Оцените статью
Английский язык
Добавить комментарий